Joseph P. Ryan & Clare Hanley of Cranbrook, BC: 2201.0012

Joseph P. Ryan & Clare Hanley of Cranbrook, BC
2201.0012

2201.0012: Joseph P. Ryan & Clare Hanley of Cranbrook, BC

Joseph P. Ryan was one of the seven co-founders of the GAA (Gaelic Athletic Association). He was born in Carrick-on-Suir in April, 1857. Having qualified as a Solicitor he practised in Callan and Thurles. In 1899 Ryan emigrated to Canada. He settled in Cranbrook, British Columbia where he became inmmersed in local life - the Board of Trade, the Mining Industry and as a Police Magistrate as well as becoming a prominent journalist. He died in March, 1918 and is buried in Cranbrook. There is no information on Clare Hanley, she was born 1865 and died in 1954. If you have any more information on Clare, please let us know.

Medium:  Photograph - Image
Date:  unknown
Source:  Columbia Basin Institute of Regional History
Collection:  Columbia Basin Institute (2201)

Keywords:

Joseph P. Ryan Clare Hanley GAA Gaelic Athletic Association Cranbrook Board of Trade Police Magistrate

Subjects:

People arrow Ryan, Josepharrow
People arrow Hanleyarrow
Cities arrow Cranbrookarrow
Cities arrow Cranbrook arrow Celebrities, Characters, Memorialsarrow
Cities arrow Cranbrook arrow Governancearrow
Associations arrow Board of Tradearrow
Associations arrow Board of Trade arrow Cranbrookarrow

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