Lookout Mountain: 0054.0447

ON LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN. – The Mountain at the Head of Spokane Street a Huge Mass of Minerals.

            On the very doorstep of Trail stands a mountain of mineral.  The capping, the ore and surroundings are the same as that of all other producers of this section, and mining men say Trail has a backing that is the best.

STEMWINDER

is owned by Wilson, Johnson, Stevenson, Hagen and Inbody.  They were working a 25-foot incline on a lead sulphite ore, highly mineralized with copper, silver and gold, very similar to the Crown Point ore.  The ore shows considerable spar, is bright and full of life, growing better as they attain depth; will increase in gold and copper, the iron working out or is taken place by copper.  Vein dips to the north, an open cut is being run to catch the ledge, which they expect to do in about ten feet; the bottom of the cut is in ore at present and looks well.  If the workmen are correct in their judgment of the foot and hanging walls, the ledge is about fifty feet wide.

SOVEREIGN.

            Four men are working on this claim, that was recently bonded for $25,000, but owing to the condition of the development work nothing could be seen.  The mine has a great showing in several spots where work has been done.

JOKER.

            Dundee, White & Claffy own this property, and have had assays as high as $16.00.  The capping has been stripped for fifty feet, showing a solid vein of ore twenty-seven feet wide, running high in copper and gold.  There has been but little work done, and it resembles a quarry more than a mine.  The work shows the mine to be an exceptionally good one, and the owners refuse a $40,000 bond.  The Joker is one of the coming properties of Lookout Mountain.

WOLVERINE.

            This claim has been stocked, the company beginning work immediately.  There are three openings which show ledges ranging in thickness  from three to six feet.  The ore is similar to that in the Crown Point.  One shaft shows a ledge six feet wide and no walls in sight.  Another opening eight feet in depth a three foot ledge is shown, the third opening that is being run into the side of the hill shows some ore but has not reached the ledge.  The claim looks very promising.

ORIENTAL.

            This is another prospect with a showing.  Claffy and Turner are the owners, the latter stating that he classes this among his best prospects, is positive shipping ore can be had by the expenditure of a few hundred dollars.  There are two shafts 15 feet each in depth but Turner believes the work has not been done in the proper place.  One shaft is sunk on a six foot ledge showing no walls.  What appears to be the hanging wall upon examination proves to be ore of a fair quality.  Assays as high as $37 have been taken from this shaft.  The vein runs northeast and is almost vertical.

0054.0447: Lookout Mountain

Description of mines and mining claims adjacent to Trail.

Medium:  Newspaper - Text
Date:  May 23, 1896
Pages:  2
Publisher:  Trail Creek News
Collection:  Columbia Basin Institute (0054)

Subjects:

Communications arrow Newspapers arrow Trail Creek Newsarrow
Physical Features arrow Mountains arrow Lookout Mountainarrow
Cities arrow Trail arrow Street Names arrow Spokane Streetarrow
Industry arrow Mining arrow Mines arrow Crown Pointarrow
Industry arrow Mining arrow Mines arrow Sovereign Minearrow
Industry arrow Mining arrow Mines arrow Stemwinder Minearrow
Industry arrow Mining arrow Mining Claims arrow Jokerarrow
Industry arrow Mining arrow Mining Claims arrow Orientalarrow
Industry arrow Mining arrow Mining Claims arrow Wolverinearrow
People arrow Whitearrow
People arrow Wilsonarrow
Dundeearrow
People arrow Turnerarrow
Joinsonarrow
People arrow Hagenarrow
People arrow Stevensonarrow
Claffyarrow
Inbodyarrow

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