Gold Creek Line Finished: 0050.0723

NEW PIPE LINE TO GOLD CREEK SATISFACTORY. – Backfilling To Be Finished at Once. – Water Will Not Be Turned In Until Concrete Has Had Time to Set Thoroughly.

            The new pipe line on the Gold Creek diversion, built by the city during the past summer, has been tested out thoroughly and has been declared satisfactory in every way.  On the first tryout some little difficulty was experienced at some of the joints and at the point where the water is siphoned for a distance.  It was found necessary to strengthen those portions of the pipe line below hydraulic grade in the reinforced concrete and to make some other little improvements.  Then a thorough test was made and the work was found to meet every requirement.

            The new water diversion is now in use, and the work of backfilling where the pipe is yet exposed for a distance of over a mile is going steadily ahead.  This is giving employment to a good number of men.  Everything will be finished before the bad weather sets in.

0050.0723: Gold Creek Line Finished

New pipe line on the Gold Creek diversion has been tested out thoroughly, and after strengthening a few places, every requirement has been met.

Medium:  Newspaper - Text
Date:  October 23, 1930
Pages:  6
Publisher:  Cranbrook Courier
Collection:  Columbia Basin Institute (0050)

Keywords:

pipe line backfilling water concrete diversion

Subjects:

Cities arrow Cranbrook arrow Utilities arrow Waterarrow
Cities arrow Cranbrook arrow Services arrow City Works arrow Water Pipearrow
Physical Features arrow Creeks arrow Gold Creekarrow
Cities arrow Cranbrook arrow Governance arrow Depression Reliefarrow

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