Grubbe & McQuaid Resign: 0050.0710

BOARD REGRETS LOSS OF VALUED MEMBER. – President W.R. Grubbe and J.H. McQuaid Were Stalwarts in the Organization While Living Here. –

            At a recent meeting of the Cranbrook board of trade considerable business was transacted.  Among other matters the road situation was discussed, and the expression of the board was to the effect that East Kootenay has enjoyed considerable improvement in the highways during the past year.  A letter was sent to Mr. Arthur Dixon, district road superintendent, expressing the appreciation of the board for his efforts during the past year.

            Regrets were expressed regarding the loss of two members of the board, in the person of W.R. Grubbe, the president, and J.H. McQuaid, who have left the district.  Their presence will be greatly missed, as they were always ready to put forth their very best efforts for the promotion of any work in connection with the board of trade.

            The finance committee gave their report, and all accounts on file were ordered paid.

            The matter of traffic signs was discussed and submitted to the city council for consideration.

0050.0710: Grubbe & McQuaid Resign

Cranbrook Board of Trade meeting discusses traffic signs and resignation of two members.

Medium:  Newspaper - Text
Date:  October 16, 1930
Pages:  1
Publisher:  Cranbrook Courier
Collection:  Columbia Basin Institute (0050)

Keywords:

board of trade member organization meeting highway traffic signs

Subjects:

People arrow Dixonarrow
People arrow Grubbearrow
People arrow McQuaidarrow
Associations arrow Board of Trade arrow Cranbrookarrow

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