Cranbrook Entertainment: 0050.0387

GREAT ARTIST TO VISIT CRANBROOK – ISOLDE MENGES AND HER $20,000 STRADIVARIUS

            Residents of Cranbrook are to be congratulated on the fact that Isolde Menges will stop off here on her way through to the Pacific Coast.  She will give a Concert in the Auditorium on the evening of December 31st.  In the afternoon she will give a free concert for the school children of Cranbrook, in pursuance of her propaganda in the cause of art and music.  She will also talk to the children.  Isolde Menges is one of the greatest artists in the world.  She is English and it is the first time anyone English has been placed on a plane of music equal to Kreisler and Ysaye.  Miss Menges’ fee for each recital is $500 and as the organization is an expensive one it is to be hoped that residents will appreciate the opportunity.  Miss Menges will play her $20,000 Strad and she will be supported by the talented Australian artist, Eileen Beattie.  This event should prove the greatest musical event in our town.  Miss Menges is being introduced by Mr. Edie who brought us the Chernivsky Brothers.  The seats are on sale at Beattie-Murphy’s drug store.

0050.0387: Cranbrook Entertainment

Isolde Menges and her $20,000 Stradivarius to vist Cranbrook.

Medium:  Newspaper - Text
Date:  December 27, 1917
Pages:  3
Publisher:  Cranbrook Herald
Collection:  Columbia Basin Institute (0050)

Keywords:

artist stradivarius auditorium recital musical

Subjects:

People arrow Beattiearrow
People arrow Ediearrow
People arrow Chernivskyarrow
People arrow Mengesarrow
Cities arrow Cranbrook arrow Buildings arrow Auditoriumarrow
Cities arrow Cranbrook arrow Entertainmentarrow

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