Windermere Mines: 0051.0472

MINES OF WINDERMERE (From The Herald Coorespondent)

            R.S. Gallup is doing some work on his claim of Horsethief creek.

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            Work is being continued on the Iron Cap, which adjoins the Red Line, with what success no one seems to know.

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            The Paystone, owned by W.S. Santo and R.O. Jennings, is another claim which will be heard from.  Some fine specimens of copper have been taken from the property.

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            The town of Peterborough, which is the general supply point for the mines on Toby, Horsethief and Spring creeks, boasts of a population of 300 people with good stores and hotels.  The townsite owners expect to put in a water supply system in the spring.

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            On Horsethief No. 3, S.T. Coff and others have a most promising silver-lead claim.  One cross cut tunnel has been run 70 feet, the lead encountered at 60 feet showing the ledge to be six feet wide with three and one-half feet of ore.  This property will be further exploited in the spring.

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            The Windermere country will undoubtedly have a boom during the coming season.  Everything points that way.  The opening up of mines which are producing ore from the surface is the magnet which is attracting investors.  A number of companies are now operating there with a success which is phenomenal.  Everyone who comes down from there are loud in their praises of the country and the wonderful showings.

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            On Bugaboo creek, 35 miles north of Windermere, Mr. McKeeman has two claims which will be extensively worked next season.  They are the Sunrise and the Sunset.  On the surface the ledge is eight feet wide, showing two feet of ore which will average 16 per cent copper.  It is advantageously located with good timber and an abundance of water, and the property can be worked by tunnels running on the ledge.  There is a trail to the claim and it can be worked the year around.

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            There are several other claims in the immediate vicinity of the Paradise which have excellent showings, among them the Silver Crown, owned by C.M. Keep and others.  Several men are employed in its development.  A 50-foot tunnel is being driven and the lead was encountered at 25 feet, with a fine showing of ore.  The Silver Belt is another belonging to the Keep syndicate.  It is the intention to do extensive work on these properties in the spring.  The Shamrock, a prospect owned by Montreal and Windermere parties, adjoining the Paradise on the north, gives promise of becoming valuable as the Paradise lead runs through the centre of the claim.  Work of development will commence on this property early in the spring.

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            The latest arrivals from Peterborough are S.T. Coff and Robert McKeeman, who have been there for several months.  Mr. McKeeman, in an interview, said: “I have been working on the Paradise group for some time, and must say that it has a wonderful showing.  Shipping ore was taken out from the grass roots, and nearly all of the openings show ore of a shipping grade.  At the present time they are taking out 150 sacks of carbonates daily, or about 10 tons.  This ore will run 50 per cent galena and 50 ounces of silver.  The ore is sacked as it comes from the shaft.  At the lowest estimate there is $100,000 worth of ore in sight.  The shaft is now down 100 feet and so far there is no change in the character of the ore.  Drifting is going on in the 50-foot level, starting with eight feet of carbonates.  A cross cut is also being run to tap the main lead.  This work is now in 150 feet, with 30 feet to run before the lead is encountered.  This will add greatly to the value of the property.  Captain Armstrong has a contract to hall the ore from the mine to the ore houses on the Columbia river, and is taking down 35 tons daily.  He has 50 horses raw hiding the ore to the wagon road at the mouth of Spring creek, and 11 wagons are used to haul from that point to the river, making one trip per day.  This ore is all taken through the town of Peterborough.  When the contract is completed the company will have $30,000 worth of ore in the warehouse ready to ship to the smelter as soon as navigation opens.  There is now 700 tons of ore at the landing.”

0051.0472: Windermere Mines

Article reporting on the ongoing good reports coming from the mines in Windermere district.

Medium:  Newspaper - Text
Date:  January 31, 1901
Pages:  1
Publisher:  Cranbrook Herald
Collection:  Columbia Basin Institute (0051)

Keywords:

mines claim copper silver-lead tunnel ledge ore timber development property horses raw hiding wagon road smelter

Subjects:

People arrow Armstrongarrow
People arrow Coffarrow
People arrow Jenningsarrow
People arrow Keeparrow
People arrow Galluparrow
People arrow McKeemanarrow
People arrow Santoarrow
Physical Features arrow Creeks arrow Bugaboo Creekarrow
Physical Features arrow Creeks arrow Horsethief Creekarrow
Physical Features arrow Creeks arrow Spring Creekarrow
Physical Features arrow Creeks arrow Toby Creekarrow
Physical Features arrow Rivers arrow Columbia Riverarrow
Cities arrow Peterborougharrow
Transportation arrow Rawhidingarrow
Industry arrow Mining arrow Mining Claims arrow Horsethief No. 3arrow
Industry arrow Mining arrow Mining Claims arrow Iron Caparrow
Industry arrow Mining arrow Mining Claims arrow Paystonearrow
Industry arrow Mining arrow Mining Claims arrow Red Linearrow
Industry arrow Mining arrow Mining Claims arrow Shamrockarrow
Industry arrow Mining arrow Mining Claims arrow Silver Beltarrow
Industry arrow Mining arrow Mining Claims arrow Silver Crownarrow
Industry arrow Mining arrow Mining Claims arrow Sunrisearrow
Industry arrow Mining arrow Mining Claims arrow Sunsetarrow

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